Our American Family - Person Sheet
Our American Family - Person Sheet
NameJames Albert JOHNSON 268,262, G Grandfather, 8
Birth DateJun 20, 1863
Birth PlaceMO
Death DateJan 9, 1948269 Age: 84
Death PlaceRocky Ford, Otero Co, CO
MemoHis Home
Burial PlaceArlington Cemetery, Kiowa Co, CO
Memo38º19’24”N 103º21”38”W
OccupationFarmer, Homesteader
FatherClark Lawrence JOHNSON , 16 (1835-1901)
MotherSarah Ann STOCKDELL , 17 (1837-1863)
Spouses
1Mary Ann HURT 268,26,21,262,24, G Grandmother, 9
Birth DateDec 1, 1871
Birth PlaceTaberville, St. Clair Co, MO
Birth DateDec 1, 1871
Birth PlaceTaberville, St. Clair Co, MO
Death DateJun 5, 194420 Age: 72
Death PlaceRocky Ford, Otero Co, CO
Death DateJun 5, 1944 Age: 72
Death PlaceRocky Ford, Otero Co, CO
Burial DateJun 8, 1944
Burial PlaceArlington Cemetery, Kiowa Co, CO
Memo38º19’24”N 103º21”38”W
OccupationWife & Mother
Education8th Grade
ReligionBaptist
FatherCharles Henry HURT , 18 (1840-1880)
MotherMargaret Ann BURKE , 19 (1840-1930)
Family ID239
Marr DateMay 6, 1885268
Marr PlaceNevada, Vernon Co, MO
ChildrenCordelia (1886-1888)
 Charles Thomas (1890-1982)
 William Henry "Bill" , 4 (1896-1980)
 Zelpho Lee (Twin) (1902-1977)
 Zelpha Marie (Twin) (1902-1984)
 Ethel Mae (1906-2001)
 Donald Austin "Don" (1910-1986)
Notes for James Albert JOHNSON
NOTE: The Johnson line up to James Albert Johnson was created through known family information. The generation of the Clark Lawrence Johnson and wives and the information about the oldest child from his first family William Henry Johnson and his descendants was verified and proved with DNA. This disproved long held beliefs as to names and relationships. Some of the oral history from Roea Ann (Ryan) Johnson about her in-laws has now proved to be confused and sometimes wrong. His mother was not Sarah McClure, but rather Sarah Ann Stockdell, McClure was the surname of his father Clark Lawrence Johnson’s second wife Vienna “Vina” McClure. There probably are other as yet to be discovered discrepancies. His birthdate is correct though as verified through a number of documents.


Raised by grandparents Albert? Johnson & Sara? (McClure?) Johnson in La Mar, MO

His grandaughter Madeline (Johnson) Barnett remembered James as a quiet man who would sit quietly smoking his pipe. Most of his life he farmed, later after they homesteaded, when they got older, they moved into Arlington, CO and kept the Arlington school clean, which Madeline ocassionally helped them with.30

This summary was provided by Roea Ann (Ryan) Johnson, Daughter-in-law of James and Mary Johnson. Roea is 92 now (1990), but very clear on dates and names of people in the past.
James A. Johnson was raised by his paternal grandparents, as his Mother died when he was three days old. They took him from Nebr. where he was born, to La Mar Missouri to live. As a young man he went to El Dorado, Mo.
His father, Clark Johnson died, leaving his money to be divided equally with the three children; but Henry being the eldest absconded with all of it, and ran off on horseback to Texas. He was never heard of again. The family figured he was killed by bushwackers for the money.
At age 25 he and Mary Ann Hurt were married 5-6-1885. Mary was the daughter of W. Henry Hurt and Margaret Ann (Burke) Hurt of El Dorado, Mo.
After the marriage they homesteaded a place 16 miles out of El Dorado, where most of their children were born. He was a farmer, and farmed all his life except for a few years. The farm wasn't always profitable, and they were encouraged by Mary's brother to go to Seattle, Wash. where they heard work and good money was to be made.
Along with three other families, including brother Thomas, they chartered a car on a freight train, loaded all the families belongings in it, they left Missouri in 1904 for Seattle. Most of the children were very young, but no illness on the way that anyone heard of. Mary's brother played the violin all the time, and they seemed to have had a pretty comfortable trip. When they arrived in Seattle, James took a job in a large factory making house shingles. Some time later their son Tom joined a group of young men and got a job on a boat bound for China. He was twenty, so when his Mother heard of this plan, she and son Bill went to the docks and took him home.
The damp weather in Wash. didn't seem the best thing for James' rheumatism, and money isn't everything, so in 1910 they left, to return to dryer climate. A brother of Mary's had gotten ahold of a homestead and wanted them to take it, so that's where they settled, just out of McCracken, Kans.
They lived and farmed that place until 1918, then moved by team and covered wagon to Arlington, Colo. Son Donald recalls he had measles on the trip out, and ate so many pork and beans, that to this day he can't eat them.
They took a government claim on a homestead 3 miles out of Arlington, and lived in a dug out house until 1920, then they moved into town. James continued to farm the place, going every day to tend his crops, then home in the evenings to milk the cows, and take care of other household chores for the family.
They stayed in Arlington until 1940, when because of failing health and advanced age they moved to Rocky Ford, Colo. to be near their daughter Zelpha, who lived there with her family. Mary died 6-5-1944. After she was gone James moved into Zelpha's home and lived there the rest of his life. He died four years after Mary died which was 1-9-1948. They both are interred at the Arlington, Colo. cemetery. 28

Newspaper obituary, no date, in Naoma Roser collection.
James A. Johnson was born June 20, 1863 in Nebraska, and he died January 9, 1948 after a long illness.
His mother died when he was three weeks old and his father's parents, who lived in La Mar county, Missouri took him to raise. At the age of 25 he married Mary Ann Hurt of El Dorado Springs, Mo., May 6, 1885. To this union were born seven children, four boys and three girls. The eldest child, a girl, died in infancy.
They resided near El Dorado Springs until the spring of 1904 when they moved to Seattle, Wash. They lived there for nine years then moved to McCracken, Kan. where they remained for eight years.
In the spring of 1917 they moved with a team and covered wagon to Arlington, Colo. where they took up a government claim near town which was their home for three years. In 1920 they moved into the town of Arlington and resided there 21 years. In 1941 they moved to Rocky Ford to be near their daughter, Mrs. U.M. Roser. Mrs. James Johnson passed away 3 1/2 years ago.
He is survived by six children Chas. T. Johnson of Joplin, Mo., William H. Johnson of Pueblo, Donald A. Johnson of Pueblo, Zelpho Johnson of Portland, Oregon, Zelpha M. Roser of Rocky Ford, Ethel M. Woodworth of Fort Lyon, Colo. He has 25 grandchildren and 18 great grandchildren.
He will be missed by his relatives and friends. He was ready to go and be with the Lord where there's no sorrow and pain.270

Typed obituary, no date or info, Naomi Roser collection.
James Albert Johnson was born 6-20-1863 in Nebr. to Clark Johnson. His mother preceeded him in death, when he was 3 days old. His fathers' parents took him into their home which was in La Mar, Mo. to raise. He went to El Dorado, MO. as a young man. He met his future wife there. At age 25 he married Mary Ann Hurt 5-6-1885. To this union was born seven children, 4 boys and 3 girls. Daughter Cordelia preceded him in death as did his wife Mary. Survivors are sons, Charles Thomas, William Henry, Zelpho Lee, and Donald Austin, Daughters Zelpha Marie Roser, Ethel May Woodworth.
They resided near El Dorado Springs, Cedar county, Mo. until the spring of 1904, when they moved to Seattle, Wash. They lived there 6 years, next settled at McCracken, Kans. Lived there 8 years.
In the spring of 1918 (June Pierce letter 7/26/95 says it was 1917) they went by covered wagon to Arlington, Colo. where they located on a government claim near town. They resided there for 3 years. In 1920 they moved into town, and lived there until moving to Rocky Ford, Colo. in 1940. He was there when he died. 1-9-1948. Interrment at Arlington cemetery besides his wife.76

From interview of Roea Ann (Ryan) Johnson, taken by Naomi Roser.
Granddad Johnson moved to El Dorado Springs, MO as a young man, where he met and married Grandma. They homesteaded a place out of El Dorado. Where most of the children were born and raised. In the period between 1906 and 1910 they moved to Seattle, WA. The westher was too damp for them so they moved back to KS. Settling on a homestead 16 miles from McCracken, where their last son was born. Here is where the children grew to adulthood. And there is where Mom met Dad.
From McCracken they moved to a homestead out of Arlington, CO. Lived there until advancing age caused them to move to Rocky Ford, CO. to be near their daughter Zelpha Roser and family. Grandma died 05 Jun 1944.
Grandpa came into our home then to live out the rest of his life. He died at home 09 Jan 1948. Both are interred at the Arlington, CO. cemetery.28

Hand Written Obituary of James Johnson from Roea Ann (Ryan) Johnson's papers.
James Johnson was born June 20, 1863 in Nebraska. His mother died when he was 3 weeks old. His father's parents took him to raise, they lived in La Mar County, Missouri. At the age of 25 he married Mary Hurt of El Dorado, Missouri, May 6, 1885. To this union was born 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls, the oldest child a girl died in infancy. They resided near El Dorado until the spring of 1904 when they moved to Seattle, Wash. They lived there 9 years, then moved to McCracken, Kansas and lived there 8 years. In the spring of 1917 they came with team and covered wagon to Arlington, CO where they located on a government claim near town, and have resided there for 3 years. Since 1920 they have made their home in Arlington.271

Lived in Rocky Ford at 707 South 14th from 1942 to his death in 1948. He was a widower when he died. Death certificate lists his age as 84 years 6months and 19 days. His funeral director was C.M.Ustick in Rocky Ford, CO.

Ellen (Johnson) Bartlett said James Albert rode mule from NE back to El Dorado Springs when he was young, 12 to 14 (maybe around 1875?). He lived with Adcocks (who were cousins). She remembers a Bill Adcock. Clark remaried after Margaret's death and had a child who died.272

In letter from Ellen (Johnson) Bartlett: James born in either Lincoln or Omaha, Nebraska. Henry Clark married Sara McClure of Grant, Nebraska married in Lamar, MO. May also check in the name Bybee around El Dorado and the family of Bill or William Adcock of El Dorado or around the area. Try Booie, Texas for Henry’s, Margaret’s & Sara death records.273

274

When the family came to Colorado, they did so because of free land provided by the Homestead Act of May 20, 1862. The story can be traced through land patents filed by family members.
1. The first to arrive in Colorado appears to have been James Albert Johnson who filed at Denver on January 23, 1911 for land patent number 172920 for 160 acres near Arlington, Colorado. William H. Taft was president of the United States at the time and his name and stamped signature is on the land patent.
2. James Johnson’s son, William Henry Johnson, filed at Lamar on March 3, 1916 for land patent number 516849 for 320 and 21/100. Woodrow Wilson was president.
3. William Johnson’s wife Roea Ann (Ryan) Johnson’s sister was Willa Wiley (Ryan) Griswould and her husband was Harry Griswould. William Henry Johnson’s brother-in-law, Harry Griswould, filed at Pueblo on September 4, 1924 for land patent number 944189 for 80 acres. Calvin Coolidge was president.
4. For a second time James Johnson added to his holdings with a filing at Pueblo on February 25, 1928 with land patent number 1012860 for an additional 157 and 7/8 hundredths acres. Calvin Coolidge was still president.
5. Four years later, for a third time James Johnson added to his holdings filing at Pueblo on March 25, 1932 with land patent number 1054040 for 175 and 24/100 acres. Herbert Hoover was president.
6. James Johnson’s daughter Ethel Mae (Johnson) Woodworth’s husband John Allen Woodworth, filed at Pueblo on July 26, 1933 for land patent number 1065226 for 230 and 36/100 hundredths acres. Franklin D. Roosevelt was president.
7. Finally, for a second time Harry Griswould added to his holdings filing at Pueblo on June 12, 1936 with land patent number 1084005 for an additional 137 and 40/100 acres. Franklin D. Roosevelt was still president.120
Medical notes for James Albert JOHNSON
He died of Rectal Carcinoma which had lasted 7 months and was due to chronic constipation.269
Research notes for James Albert JOHNSON
Mormon numbers:
Film # 960811
Batch # M515882

1930 Census200
1920 Census275
1910 Census266
1900 Census25
1885 May 6, Nevada, Vernon Co, MO marriage license

NOT listed in:
1870 Dodge Co, NE
1880 Cedar Co, MO
1870 Vernon Co, MO
Notes for Mary Ann (Spouse 1)
Her granddaughter Madeline Johnson Barnett remember that Mary Ann Hurt helped her husband farm and in later years she and her husband cleaned the Arlington school house and Madeline as a young little girl help them occassionally.30

Obituary (typed, no info in Namoi Roser's collection)
Mary Ann Hurt Johnson was born 12-1-1869 in El Dorado Spgs. Cedar county, Missouri, to W. Henry and Margaret Ann (Burke) Hurt.
She resided with her parents until her marriage to James Albert Johnson 5-6-1885 at Nevada, Vernon county, Mo.
To this union was born 7 children. One daughter preceded her in death.
She is survived by husband James, 4 sons and 2 daughters. Charles Thomas, William Henry, Zelpho Lee, Donald Austin, Zelpha Marie Roser, and Ethel May Woodworth.
They were living in Rocky Ford, Colo. at the time of her death. 6-5-1944.
Interrment at Arlington, Colo.270

Lists her address as 509 South 13th Rocky Ford, CO.Undertaker as C.M.Ustick of Rocky Ford, CO.

Letter to John Johnson 7/26/95 mentioned the following incident about Mary Ann Hurt Johnson.
This is not historical news, but as a small child I (Alma June Pierce) remeber the 50th wedding anniversary (I think it was 50th) the point was the kids My Mom (Ethel), Zelpha, Zelpho, etc. got enough money to buy Grandma Johnson a wedding bank. I remember she cried and cried. I said to my Mom "I though Grandma would be happy, why is she crying?" I don't remember much of the reply, something about "She IS Happy" but that didn't explain the crying to me then."276

Hand Written Obituary of Mary Ann Hurt Johnson from Roea (Ryan) Johnson's papers.
Mary Ann Hurt was born Dec 1, 1869 near El Dorado, MO, where she resided with her parents until her marriage to James Johnson, May 6, 1885 at Nevada, Vernon Co, MO. To this union was born 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls. The oldest child a girl died in infancy. They resided near El Dorado until the spring of 1904 when they moved to Seattle, Wash. They lived there 9 years, then moved to McCracken, Kansas, where they lived 8 years; then in the spring of 1917 they came with team and covered wagon to Arlington, Colorado, where they located on a government claim near town and have resided there for 3 years. Since 1920 they have made their home in Arlington.277

Mar 2002: email from Charlene Wein <CWein1109@aol.com>24

Death certificate from Otero County Colorado, City of Rocky Ford. Notes taken by Naomi Roser from Roea Johnson lists birth date as Dec 1, 1869 at El Dorado Springs, Cedar Co, MO
Medical notes for Mary Ann (Spouse 1)
Death certificate from Otero County Colorado, city of Rocky Ford. Died 05 Jun 1944 of cerebral embolesum which had lasted for 5 days, with contributing causes of importance cardia vascular disorder which had lasted 4 years and arterial seclusion which had lasted 1 year.278

I found a note written by my mother Matilda Marie Johnson that said "Great Grandma Johnson had 2 sets of twins (1 set miscarried).279
Research notes for Mary Ann (Spouse 1)
HURT English34

have: marriage liscense, death certificate

1930 Census200
1920 Census275
1910 Census266
1900 Census25
1880 Census21
1870 Census26
Last Modified May 3, 2018Created May 21, 2018 using Reunion on a Macintosh


Created May 21, 2018.
© Copyright 1993-2018 by John Johnson.

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“People do not die for us immediately, but remain bathed in a sort of aura of life which bears no relation to true immortality but through which they continue to occupy our thoughts in the same way as when they were alive. It is as though they were traveling abroad.”
― Marcel Proust